Nurturing Wildlife Through Thoughtful Gardening and Tree Maintenance

Conservation Action Volunteers at Maggie Sottero Designs planted several new trees at Tracy Aviary in Salt Lake City, UT. Photos: Maggie Sottero Designs

While winter may seem like an unlikely time to engage in gardening and tree trimming, it is worth enduring the chill if it means we are protecting the birds who occupy these spaces during the nesting season.

The months of October through February are actually very important for caring for your trees and gardens, making them attractive, safe places for wild birds year-round. Planting trees in the fall allows them to focus their energy on root growth during the winter months, and trimming your trees in the fall and winter prevents any mishaps with nesting birds. Check out our video for more advice on winter tree trimming for bird safety.

Recently our corporate Conservation Action Volunteers at Maggie Sottero braved the chilly weather to do some tree planting and habitat care at the Tracy Aviary in Salt Lake City.

Maggie Sottero Designs is a member of Bird Rescue’s Conservation Action Program, which teaches ways to help birds in your community.

Caring for the plants not only makes a healthier environment for the resident birds at the aviary but for the migratory visitors that drop by and use the habitats as well.

The Maggie team helped trim the annuals growing near the pelican pond and spread their seeds, setting them up to grow back in full strength next year. The horticulture team at Tracy Aviary also provided a lesson on tree planting before handing things over to the volunteers to plant several new trees that will provide excellent habitat for the numerous Black-capped Chickadees, Downy Woodpeckers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and other species that live in the area.

“It was a lot of fun to get together with our friends at Maggie Sottero and get a little bit dirty in an effort to improve habitat for the birds in our community. That’s what our Conservation Action Program is all about: building partnerships and working together to make a difference for birds and their habitats,” said Bird Rescue Conservation & Education Specialist, Angie Trumbo.

In a world so altered by human development, creating oases in places like parks, zoos, and even your own backyard is critical for the survival of wild birds. You can make a big difference with a few small actions. Learn some tips on Winter Gardening for Birds from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and visit our website to get involved with our Conservation Action Program to help birds in your community.

Thanks to Community Action Program Volunteers from Maggie Sottero, several newly-planted trees will provide excellent habitat for the numerous Black-capped Chickadees, Downy Woodpeckers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and other species that live in the area.